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advice please on early neutering/de sexing

 early neutering is fairly new in uk, am now looking into pros and cons of early neutering. any advice or info would be great we have decided to neuter our kittens early to help prevent them getting into the wrong hands, our vet is happy to neuter our female kittens but not so keen regards the boys, we have found another vet that will do the males however, i understand the reason for our usuall vet not being keen,
please those that already neuter early i would apreciate your advice and opinion  regards this, at what age are breeders neutering, we thinking that  girls would be done at 14 weeks, males i dont know!!!!

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  • Hi Shelly
    Mine are all neutered/spayed once they reach 12 weeks or 1kg. I like them to weigh at least 1.2kilos myself, and at 12 weeks they should have no trouble meeting this requriement. I have had none die in the last 3 years since i began. i have heard of others is australia and america that do them at 8weeks, but i dont see the need for this as they cant go to their new homes til 12 weeks anyway.
    In addition, i think myself that they recover much better, do not pull at stitches which they do when older, and it stops the accidental breedings at 4 months for those that come on call early.
    i do not understand about your vet and the males as these are even easier than the females. no stitches and up and eating dinner the same night!
    hope this helps
    Peta

    i do not uder
  • Hi Shelly,

    I too desex early. I get desexing done at 10wks, in btwn their vaccinations. They are all usually a suitable weight by this time. I too dont understand why they wont do the boys... The boys are much easier, and like Peta said, are up and running immediately after.
    I started to desex early immediately when i started breeding, and have never had any complications.
    In fact, i am more nervous at getting older girls desexed when i retire them from breeding. From this, i have had problems of post op bleeding. This doesnt seem to happen with the younger kitties.

    Best of luck,
    abby
  • my vet was worried because at 12/14 weeks old a male kitten has very little there!!! and said that later on this could cause complications with urinating problems, hormone problems etc although i want to do my best for my kittens im not wanting to risk there health, its a tough one for me! i know many countrie abroad neuter early with feral cats!
  • Hi Shelly

    It is and will remain I suspect a controversial issue and gets discussed frequently on various forums from what I gather. It has to be an individual informed decision and from my perspective I don't early desex and never will. My reasons are due to the impact on the developing immune system. We can't see what that impact is but we do know how vulnerable kittens are in those early months.

    One of the leading university vet hospitals here doesn't early desex and recommends around 5-6 months and that is good enough for me. I accept the reasoning behind it in rescue facilities but the kittens I produce are my responsibility and I would rather err on the side of caution and let them mature and experience the stress of desexing after they have had a chance to recover from the other general stressors that go along with being a young kitten.

    I have heard of the odd kitten death due to the process but from what I gather, and which is confirmed by the above posts, if done by an experienced vet it doesn't seem to happen very often. I am sure if you have a few kittens that do end up having problems then you might rethink the process. For most thankfully on the surface anyway it seems it is trouble free.

    I think what gets left out of the debate is that it is not really a health issue associated with the well being of the individual animal. That is a secondary consideration in most cases once you start to debate the reasons why people do it.

    It is very much a political issue and is about animal management due to overpopulation and unwanted animals ending up in rescue facilities. Attempts to address the problem are definitely important but it seems compulsory early desexing is not necessarily going to solve the problem. The motivation for breeders however is quite different as for some it is about protecting their own interests and that is not openly stated very often.

    Nobody wants to see countless numbers of kittens ending up in rescue situations but the majority of cats that end up that way are not pedigree cats bought from breeders. Sure there is a percentage that are but majority are not.

    Some states in Australia have introduced legislation to make early desexing compulsory, that I totally disagree with and don't believe it will be very successful. In fact there is a study that has examined the outcome of the legislation the ACT and it raises some really interesting points about just that. For anyone interested here is the link: http://avacms.eseries.hengesystems.com.au/AM/Template.cfm?Section=H...

    Got a bit off topic but it is all food for thought around early desexing and I think examining it from all angles when you making decisions can only be a good thing.

    Good luck with your decision whatever way you choose.

    Gill
  • There are several studies regarding early spay/neuter. Most of them have been done in the US, mainly because this practice has been done there for a long time.
    Kitten altered before 14 weeks of age have been followed in their growth to confirm that no side-effects can be identified.
    You can find most studies on google, but below you can find a few.
    This is not a controversial topic on a health point of view.
    Of course it might be an ethical controversal topic.

    Fortunately it has been more than proved the efficacy of this practice and how harmless it is for our kittens.

    I have personally been doing it for 7 years and I've never had any issues.
    Especially male kittens recover incredibly fast. Females take a little more, but still it's amazing how quickly they go back to playing.

    Here you can find some of the best studies about early spay/neuter:

    http://www.cfa.org/articles/health/early-neuter.html

    http://catvet.homestead.com/earlyalter.html (from Susan Little)

    http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/Health/spay-neuter.html (Winn feline foundation)
  • I personally will not desex our kittens, I don't believe there is ANY evidence to prove that the stress of the procedure doesn't affect the kittens developing immune system. It may not kill them immediately but leave their immune systems vulnerable and increase the risk of the kitten developing FIP.

    I don't take all the care that I can to bring my kittens up in a safe environment to then put them through an unneccessary surgical procedure that might kill them (if not immediately)

    I think we sometimes forget that our kittens in a very short time are, vaccinated twice, wormed numerous times, weaned, often travel interstate and have the stress of leaving the safety of mum and siblings. I want to send my kittens on that journey knowing that their immature immune system is in the best possible health to help them get through the transition of leaving home and settling in their new environment.
  • all unscrupulous breeders, only and exclusively for matters relating to specific desire to do not broadcast certain bloodlines, sterilize their puppies at an early age. any valid vet conscientiously and professionally not ever recommend such operation. studies that prove the contrary are conveyed by the desire of these breeders with no scientific training. is absolutely certain that the puppies male also develop urethra problems after a few years of life. Be wary of those who argue the opposite just for selfish needs. And especially in a climate of uncertainty about the likely development of diseases, you'd also Sterilization your puppies? think before you say what you do not know exactly

    see u all

    Danilo.
  • Well said Rosario.

    rosario said:
    all unscrupulous breeders, only and exclusively for matters relating to specific desire to do not broadcast certain bloodlines, sterilize their puppies at an early age. any valid vet conscientiously and professionally not ever recommend such operation. studies that prove the contrary are conveyed by the desire of these breeders with no scientific training. is absolutely certain that the puppies male also develop urethra problems after a few years of life. Be wary of those who argue the opposite just for selfish needs. And especially in a climate of uncertainty about the likely development of diseases, you'd also Sterilization your puppies? think before you say what you do not know exactly

    see u all

    Danilo.
  • Rosario, maybe you can come to my house and see how well developed my kittens are...
    A friend of mine will be very happy to show you her devon rex, born in my cattery, 3 years old, spayed at 12 weeks...
    In 3 years I spayed 16 kittens, none have any problems...

    Rosario and Janelle please post us some scientific articles about you are saying because I never see them...
  • Righetti, Shelley asked for peoples opinions, I gave my opinion. Personally I don't care what you do, I am only interested in the welfare of my own cats. I don't need scientific articles, common sense tells me that a surgical procedure is going to be stressful and stress has a negative effects on the immune system....thats all I need to know. Not very scientific is it?
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