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Three faces of F.I.P.

These three kittens are all from the same litter, the two little red kittens were P.T.S. by their new owners. The little Torti girl "Bug" is still with us, she had 70mls of fluid drained from her chest cavity, at the moment (and I pray forever) she is doing really well.As a new breeder the harsh reality of F.I.P. has been devastating for ourselves and the families that loved our kittens for a short time :(Both parents of this litter have been desexed.

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  • I lost my very first kitten to Dry F.I.P. at 9 months old. It was horrible. He was healthy and active at 4 months. He is the only one we have lost. we decided to use inter-nasals using the most aggressive schedule possible before starting the injectable immunizations and we keep every one on L-Lysine. Good luck with your Torti. Elaine Adkins
  • Hi Janelle. Firstly, I am so sorry. It is such a devastating disease & I must admit since becoming aware of it I try so hard to be scrupulous with their trays etc. Was an autopsy performed on the 2 kittens PTS? Fingers crossed for little Bug.
  • An Autopsy was not performed on either kitten, oddly enough both people lived in the same suburb and took both kittens to the same vet. I never questioned his prognosis as the day that I had Bugs chest drained was the same day that the first lady emailed and said that Stevie had been PTS. I spoke at length to their vet who was a very lovely man, this was weeks ago so I didn't know what questions to ask him about Stevies symptoms.

    It was only early this week that Charlie was PTS and the same vet told the lady that his abdomen was filled with fluid, once again I havn't questioned his diagnosis. I think he must have explained to the lady that the only way to confirm F.I.P. was an autopsy, she didn't feel comfortable with having this done and that is entirely her decision.

    The vets are really surprised at Bugs recovery, she is unmedicated and to date is spending her time playing with hairbands and chasing imaginary butterflies. I watch her breathing carefully and sometimes wonder if it is any different? For now I will enjoy her, I can be sad later :(
  • Janelle, You have had a really tough time of it lately. I really feel for you. :(

    Fingers crossed for Bug but as you say enjoy her now while she is doing so well. She looks like a real little cutie.
  • How sad when you see photos of these beautiful babies. Not much more to say Janelle other than to applaud your courage and to say I hope being able to talk about it helps a bit. As far as diagnosis goes it is easier to diagnose wet FIP as the fluid composition is quite specific in FIP.

    Sometimes I think people misunderstand the references to it being difficult to diagnose. In many cases the problem with diagnosing FIP is more about there being no specific diagnostic test to say 100% that's what it is. It is however quite recognisable in many cases and it doesn't take much to put the pieces together. Dry FIP however is much more confusing and as with any suspected case of FIP they do need to be as sure as possible before euthanasing.

    Bug's wellness is a bit unusual as I understand it given she is not on any meds. You hear of so many variations in the course of the disease which just highlights the response of each individual cat.

    We don't have the intranasal sprays available here and they are only of value in high risk situations and prior to a kittens exposure to FCoV. Just a question from your post, what do you mean when you say "injectable immunisation", as from my understanding there is only the intranasal FIP vaccine and nothing available in injectable form?

    This is the sort of discussion that we can have in the live chat discussion.
    Gill
  • The vet that the other two kittens saw has only been working in Australia for about 4 years. He stated that in the U.K. he saw alot of FIP cases, mine were the first he has come across in Australia.

    My vet said to me a couple of months ago that FIP was a thing of the past, just goes to show that sadly not all vets are up to speed with FIP.

    Gill, I would love a discussion on FIP, I cannot quiet figure out why it is such a Taboo subject? I am happy for the world to know that we have had kittens develop FIP, but, also that I am committed to do everything that is within my powers to lessen the chances of any other kittens/owners suffering needlessly.

    Janelle
  • I think there are a number of reasons for the taboo. Fear is one of the major factors. There is such a lack of understanding of it, and the fact that it takes so many kittens and there is no cure. If we all worked together on this disease and were open and honest as you have been we might get somewhere. There are too many Devons dying of it that is for sure and none of us can feel confident we will not be affected.

    It is just not ethical however to keep breeding with cats that are an obvious problem (and I say obvious as it is not always that clear cut), and to ignore the realities of husbandry practices that increase risk. I have great faith in some of the newer Devon breeders and a couple of those who have been around for awhile. Being informed and proactive feels so much better as if the worst does happen at least you have a better idea of where the problem has originated and can take steps to prevent it happening again.

    It is common sense, ethics and doing what is in the best interests of the kittens you produce, the new owners and other breeders who won't inherit the problem. We all have a responsibility to do our best to reduce the risk of it in the kittens we produce, knowing at this point in time we cannot prevent it totally.

    Gill

    Janelle Harvey said:
    The vet that the other two kittens saw has only been working in Australia for about 4 years. He stated that in the U.K. he saw alot of FIP cases, mine were the first he has come across in Australia.

    My vet said to me a couple of months ago that FIP was a thing of the past, just goes to show that sadly not all vets are up to speed with FIP.

    Gill, I would love a discussion on FIP, I cannot quiet figure out why it is such a Taboo subject? I am happy for the world to know that we have had kittens develop FIP, but, also that I am committed to do everything that is within my powers to lessen the chances of any other kittens/owners suffering needlessly.

    Janelle
  • FIP is a mutation of the corona virus and if you can keep the kittens from getting the corona virus you can prevent the FIP. I use 3 way internasal and then switch to 4 way eclipse. I always include l-lysine with food. Elaine

    Gill said:
    How sad when you see photos of these beautiful babies. Not much more to say Janelle other than to applaud your courage and to say I hope being able to talk about it helps a bit. As far as diagnosis goes it is easier to diagnose wet FIP as the fluid composition is quite specific in FIP.

    Sometimes I think people misunderstand the references to it being difficult to diagnose. In many cases the problem with diagnosing FIP is more about there being no specific diagnostic test to say 100% that's what it is. It is however quite recognisable in many cases and it doesn't take much to put the pieces together. Dry FIP however is much more confusing and as with any suspected case of FIP they do need to be as sure as possible before euthanasing.

    Bug's wellness is a bit unusual as I understand it given she is not on any meds. You hear of so many variations in the course of the disease which just highlights the response of each individual cat.

    We don't have the intranasal sprays available here and they are only of value in high risk situations and prior to a kittens exposure to FCoV. Just a question from your post, what do you mean when you say "injectable immunisation", as from my understanding there is only the intranasal FIP vaccine and nothing available in injectable form?

    This is the sort of discussion that we can have in the live chat discussion.
    Gill
  • Well John and Shannae have just walked back in from having Bug put to rest.

    I am so proud of Shannae (16 yrs old), while I hid at home and didn't even say goodbye to Bug (after making the decision to ring the vet) Shannae went with John. Bug was used to the car and used to just cuddle on Shannaes lap or look out the window. Shannae then went into the vets room and cuddled Bug for ten minutes after they gave her something to make her drowsy, Shannae then left Bug with John while the vet put her to rest.

    What a brave child, she has certainly grown up a stronger and more compassionate person than me. She thought of Bug before herself.

    I took some photos of Bug playing in the garden today, I will post them later.
  • Oh, I am so sorry Janelle. :( RIP little Bug.
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