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Poor Claude he has been through so much in his life so far with regards to intolerable itching caused by this condition. He has been having to wear an Elizabethan collar for weeks because this is the only thing that can stop him mutilating his skin.Last week we finally got the diagnosis from an Animal Dermatologist located in Ryde Sydney. From what I can gather this is a genetic problem so it has been passed down to Claude. We are in the middle of trialing a Lamb only food unfortunately he wouldn't have a part of kangaroo and rabbit was impossible to source unless we went out and found them ourselves which was not going to happen.I would love to hear from other Devon owners out there who have a Devon Rex with Uritcaria Pigmentosa to compare notes and perhaps ideas.Fortunately for us Claude's friend Betty the other Devon in the picture has no skin problems.

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  • I have been fortunate & have had no problems with any skin disorders, but have heard of others that do.

    By what you are saying about trialling a lamb only diet, is it related to a food allergy or is this something you hope will help?
  • Hi Jan and welcome,
    I have not heard of this before so I am afraid I am not much help.
    Hopefully some other members have had some experience with this and can help further.
    It must be very difficult for both you and Claude..
  • Thanks Nicole I am sure out there/here on this site there is a wealth of knowledge that is just waiting to be tapped into.

    Nicole said:
    Hi Jan and welcome,
    I have not heard of this before so I am afraid I am not much help.
    Hopefully some other members have had some experience with this and can help further.
    It must be very difficult for both you and Claude..
  • Hi Joy I just wrote a reply to your message however hmm something happened and it has disappeared oh well never mind. Basically Devon cats that have this condition can also be allergic to other things they are what you would call hypersensitive hence trialling the lamb for six weeks to see if this helps. What could happen though is that we will not be able to find out just all the things that Claude is allergic to because so many of them are in the air. He might and I cross my fingers that this will not happen have to spend the rest of his life on Cortisone, Antihistamines and God forbid a drug called Cyclosporine. One thing for sure though we are lucky we caught it early (Claude is going on 11mths) because the Dermatologist showed me some pictures on his computer of two other Devons he had treated in the last six months and these poor cats had lesions all over them it was sooo awful. I shall keep posting as we find out more. Thanks for your interest! Jan

    Joy said:
    I have been fortunate & have had no problems with any skin disorders, but have heard of others that do.

    By what you are saying about trialling a lamb only diet, is it related to a food allergy or is this something you hope will help?
  • Ihave never heard of this either I hope that you can get some good results with the exclusion diet.
  • I just found this information about dermatoligal condition in devons on the fab site: Not sure if i'm allowed to paste so let me know nicole joy ?

    Dermatological conditions

    Congenital hypotrichosis (reduced amount of hair) (*)

    Hypotrichosis means a lack of hair. In some cases it is believed to be inherited as a monogenic recessive trait. For this breed the coat is always fine but some cats have significantly less hair and these are described as hypotricotic.



    Malassezia dermatitis

    Malassezia pachydermatitis is a single celled yeast commonly found on the skin of Devon Rex cats (up to 100% of sampled cats). It can cause otitis externa, greasy seborrhoea, erythema and pruritis. Devon Rex cats are perticularly prone to paronychia and nail discolouration due to Malassezia. Treatment involves topical anti-fungal drugs and as shown in the study below oral anti-fungals can also be effective.

    Ahman, S., Perrins, N. & Bond, R. (2007) Carriage of Malassezia spp. yeasts in healthy and seborrhoeic Devon Rex cats. Med Mycol 45:449-455
    Ahman, S.,Perrins, N. & Bond, R. (2007) Treatment of Malassezia pachydermatis-associated seborrhoeic dermatitis in Devon Rex cats with itraconazole--a pilot study. Vet Dermatol. 18:171-4
    Colombo S., Nardoni S., Cornegliani L., Mancianti F. (2007) Prevalence of Malassezia spp. Yeasts in feline nail folds: a cytological and mycological study. Vet Dermatol 18:278-283



    Urticaria pigmentosa (r)

    This condition has been described in Sphynx cats and the study below describes a similar condition in 5 Devon Rex cats. Clinical signs include erythematous and crusted papules on the trunk and ventral thorax. Histological examination showed mastocytic and eosinophilic infiltrate in the dermis. Treatment includes prednsiolone and essential fatty acids.

    Noli, C., Colombo, S., Abramo, F. & Scarampella (2004) Papular eosinophilic/mastocytic dermatitis (feline urticaria pigmentosa) in Devon Rex cats: A distinct disease entity or a histopathological reaction pattern? Vet Dermatol 15:253-9
  • How old is Claude? If he is still young you might find it will improve as he gets older and his immune system develops. One of my pet boys had it when he was around a year old and it then cleared up by itself and we haven''t had any problems since. He is now 6 years old.

    You can buy rabbit near where I am here in the Hills District. We actually have a chicken shop in Kellyville that has fresh rabbits if you are interested.

    Have you thought about trying the natural care veterinary clinic in Russell Lea. They are pretty amazing there and one of the things that alternative therapies have over traditional vet treatment is success with skin conditions. I wouldn't go near cortisone as while it clears it up in the short term the long term damage it causes isn't worth it imo.

    Such an awful thing to have to deal with and it is such a hard one to get on top of. Hope you can get it under control.

    Gill
  • Sorry Jen, I have just seen this. It depends if it is copyright. If it is you can still post the link..
    Can you let me know the link of the source?

    Jenifer said:
    I just found this information about dermatoligal condition in devons on the fab site: Not sure if i'm allowed to paste so let me know nicole joy ?
    >
  • a question from a beginner with devons - one of our three devons has a thick wooly textured coat - are the fully coated devons different in this respect as to skin problems then? am asking this since both our si rex devons have full coats and they seldom spill them at all they are just like little wooly lambs before being sheared - the brown tabby devon rex does lose some of her coat sometimes mostly beneath the chin and the neck area and also on her tummy - does this mean mine wont suffer from skin problems ? ps we feed them plenty of freshly cooked chicken and also sometimes some tuna and use the royal canin catfoods inc theres one called health and skin in a dried food packet this seems to be good for their coats - maybe its the cooler moister british climate though? does it vary from country to country and climate to climate as to what sort of coats the devons do tend to have or is it all genetics ? am going to lean a great deal and appreciate this in case I decide to breed one day - ps royal canin brands do make one containing lamb by the way if this helps and if available in australia ?
  • Thanks babs well our family are beginners as well re the Devon Rex! The other members would be able to tell you more re the coats I think. We did have Claude on the Royal Caan kitten dry food but the vet told us to take him off it and put him on one food eg the lamb. With regards to the Urticaria Pigmentosa its definitely a genetic thing however as someone else said he must might grow out of it as in become less hypersensitive.

    Babs Chiara Bailey said:
    a question from a beginner with devons - one of our three devons has a thick wooly textured coat - are the fully coated devons different in this respect as to skin problems then? am asking this since both our si rex devons have full coats and they seldom spill them at all they are just like little wooly lambs before being sheared - the brown tabby devon rex does lose some of her coat sometimes mostly beneath the chin and the neck area and also on her tummy - does this mean mine wont suffer from skin problems ? ps we feed them plenty of freshly cooked chicken and also sometimes some tuna and use the royal canin catfoods inc theres one called health and skin in a dried food packet this seems to be good for their coats - maybe its the cooler moister british climate though? does it vary from country to country and climate to climate as to what sort of coats the devons do tend to have or is it all genetics ? am going to lean a great deal and appreciate this in case I decide to breed one day - ps royal canin brands do make one containing lamb by the way if this helps and if available in australia ?
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